Chez l'abeille

Culture. Travel. Writing. My world in words and pictures


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“Planet Odd”

planet oddI’m don’t know about you but I’m only just getting my head around the new world order. In a heartbeat what seemed so ordinary, now seems either really hard to achieve or simply not necessary. I seem to be setting myself simple goals on a daily basis – mostly linked to locating ordinary items I would not have given a single thought too in that previous world we inhabited.

I also work in early education so the current issue of children being in or out of school is all consuming. I have seen many parents coming online to ask about the kinds of things they can do with their children whilst they are at home – which at this moment could be for quite a while.

For children who are almost at the end of their reception year parents can still find ways to help children practice their developing reading skills. At this stage in the school year children have typically been exposed to most of the letters in the alphabet (graphemes) and the sounds they make (phonemes). They can match a sound to a letter. (phoneme -grapheme correspondence) and they can hear the sounds through a word. They may have learnt to do “robot arms” when they orally chop up the sounds in a word This “segmenting” will help them with writing. For example, red is split into 3 distinct sounds, r/e/d. The other way around, when they put the sounds together, (blending)  is a key skill they draw on to read. Being able to independently read simple words like this is a key target for children going on into year 1. Reading books together will help children at this crucial stage of cracking the reading code. Find words in any books you have that are easily segmented and blended. Look for common words such as “the” or “my” which are not so easily blended (sometimes called tricky words). I found a useful video that might help anyone who wants to know a bit more.

Children read and understand simple sentences. They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately. They also read some common irregular words.They demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read.   (Early Learning Goal for Reading)

The Maverick Yellow Band Early Readers are the perfect match for this vital stage of reading development. Among the most recent additions to the collection is the fabulously titled Planet Odd, which matches the current state of the world outside our front doors. Written by Jenny Jinks and illustrated by Roman Diaz, it follows the adventures of Kip, who crash lands on a planet quite unlike his own. This planet is r/e/d! Thankfully, Kip meets Zak, the odd resident of the red planet, who turns out to be quite a helpful character. The illustrations provide some excellent opportunities for a spot the difference conversation as Zak and Kip travel towards a solution for returning Kip home. Much of the story is told through conversation and works well with the visual story told through the pictures.

Another winner for me is “Too Much Noise” by Cath Jones, illustrated by Leesh Li. This story has a more classic, bedtime story feel to it. Poor Rabbit cannot sleep because of bear’s rumbling tummy! However, Rabbit is a true friend and after much  effort Bear can sleep again. Or can he?! I was reminded of one of my old favourites, “Peace at Last” by Jill Murphy, so if that is a family favourite I’d bet on this one being a winner too.

“Bad Robot” (which I cannot say without hearing the ident for the production company of the same name) by Elizabeth Dale and Felicia Whaley is the tale of Max and his robot Rob. This is a fun story with a great twist at the end, that I certainly didn’t see coming! Finally “The Red Rocket Pirates” by Katie Dale and Elena Resko will certainly appeal to all pirate lovers out there. The story is well paced and there are many laugh out loud moments! With Easter on the way the ending feels just right.

So if you’re in lock down with a Reception age child, I would recommend any of these new books, along with the full range of Early Readers. As with all the books in the scheme they are well written, perfectly pitched and above all fun!

Stay safe and well and KEEP READING!

 

©Chez l’abeille  2020

Disclaimer: I was provided with complimentary copies of the books by Maverick Books. I was not recompensed for this review and all views are my own.


“The Pirate who lost his name” by Lou Treleavan and Genie Espinosa

Finding new texts to enthuse young children is always a teacher’s top priority. In recent times, I don’t think I’ve got through a school year without seeing a pirate context being used in an early years classroom somewhere. Most young children love the idea of pirates and know a lot about them too. The-Pirate-Who-Lost-His-Name-Cover-LR-RGB-JPEGThis new book by Lou Treleaven and Genie Espinosa brings a new twist to the pirate genre, and offers some strong curriculum links too.

The front cover bears some detailed investigation and consideration; our pirate protagonist is sporting a quizzical look and a very large bump on his head, his parrot is wearing a rather long -suffering look and the way-sign suggests we’re off on a journey. Lots to discuss and predict from there onwards.

Our main character has all the trappings of your usual high seas brigand – he is the very model of a model modern pirate but unfortunately he’s forgotten his name. There is a very engaging double spread explaining exactly how, which took me a while to fully appreciate. In a series of small vignettes we are able to visually read the cause of his amnesia, which adds some useful practice of inference and deduction skills to the telling of this tale.

So begins our hero’s quest: to find a way to remember his name. His first stop at Captain dreamboat’s heart shaped island would provide opportunities to investigate 2d and 3d shapes in nature. I was immediately reminded of the famous heart shaped island in the Maldives, but discovered more!

At each port of call, he gets closer and closer to discovering his name and the parrot becomes more insistent with her squawks of frustration. Then almost at the point of failure his name is revealed! There’s a nice twist at the end too which will have the reader and listener laughing.

This story would also provide opportunities to discuss the cast of characters and their various attributes. Each pirate has a hugely descriptive name and sometimes some quite subtle characteristics. Captain Anorak certainly wears an anorak, but why does our pirate rush away when the “One Thousand Favourite Pirate Postcards Scrapbook” is produced? Understanding the multiple meanings of words and phrases is a skill the reader needs to develop so they can really understand the texts they engage with. I think having opportunities to do this with language and not just images is important. My only request would be to even up the gender balance as I could only find three female pirates who all had background roles. (Maybe there’s an idea for me to ponder and add to my “to write” list!)

All in all this is a funny story, with depth to the tale and the illustrations, and one which will bear multiple readings. A worthy addition to the pirate canon!

And if anyone can tell me what movie the “Best Pirate Beard Contest” poster is referencing, could you please let me know? I REALLY can’t remember.

©Chez l’abeille  2019

The Pirate Who Lost His Name

Disclaimer: I was provided with a complimentary copy of the book by Maverick Books. I was not recompensed for this review and all views are my own.