Chez l'abeille

Culture. Travel. Writing. My world in words and pictures


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An aliens guide to… new non-fiction readers!

Another great bundle of books arrived recently, just in time for the start of the school year! Among the collection was a set of new non-fiction readers pitched at the Year 2 end of the book bands.

The books have the same set up as the other non-fiction readers. Zeek and Finn are providing essential information for extra-terrestrial tourists. This collection has a loose environmental theme, which will appeal to readers interested in the impact humans have on the world around us – a very hot topic.

img_1759“Going Green” explores how we are finding alternative ways of producing our energy. Covering wind power, wave power and geothermal energy there are a wide range of ideas and information which would provoke discussions about how we are managing our resources. With many schools looking at how they can become more eco-friendly this book should easily find a home in the class library.

“Food for Thought” and “City Animals” would also be useful reference books for the Science Programme of Study in Year 2 .

“Pupils should be introduced to the idea that all living things have certain characteristics that are essential for keeping them alive and healthy. They should raise and answer questions that help them to become familiar with the life processes that are common to all living things. Pupils should be introduced to the terms ‘habitat’ (a natural environment or home of a variety of plants and animals) and ‘micro-habitat’ (a very small habitat, for example for woodlice under stones, logs or leaf litter). They should raise and answer questions about the local environment that help them to identify and study a variety of plants and animals within their habitat and observe how living things depend on each other, for example, plants serving as a source of food and shelter for animals. Pupils should compare animals in familiar habitats with animals found in less familiar habitats, for example, on the seashore, in woodland, in the ocean, in the rainforest.”

With this in mind, “City Animals” will provide a positive challenge to possible established ideas about habitats, in particular some of the larger animals found living alongside humans.

In this 50th anniversary year of the first lunar landing the last book, “Our Place in Space” also feels timely. Reading through this text I discovered quite a few things I didn’t actually know! When I was last teaching space, Pluto was always the last planet – usually held aloft by an energetic child at the furthest end of the playground as we recreated the solar system on a human scale. Now I learn it has been downgraded to being a dwarf planet. Sorry Pluto, you were always a favourite.

I’m a big fan of these books – they work well as individual readers but also as books to dip into with groups and the whole class. The environmental issues discussed could be used within science teaching but also to prompt wider discussions about the impact of humans on the earth and beyond. With these discussions becoming more and more relevant in the lives of young people, even down to the Early Years, I think they will find much to engage with here.

©Chez l’abeille  2019

Disclaimer: I was provided with complimentary copies of the books by Maverick Books. I was not recompensed for this review and all views are my own.


Testing, testing…

Once more I have embarked on the endless project known as “Fixing Chez L’Abeille”. I’ve not had the energy to do anything since the last epic dust storm but the time has come to bite the bullet once again. However, what I thought would be a few days upheaval whilst some simple adjustments to decor and plug location were completed, has turned into a need to rewire my poor old house so everything has ground to an unplanned halt. It’s a situation that is definitely testing me!

Thus, as the sun came out over London town for what seems the first time in months, I was desperate to get out and see something more stimulating than bare plaster walls and holes where uplights once lived.

I was headed for the newly opened Tate Modern extension but halfway there I was waylaid. In fact that really should be weigh-laid because the never visited Kirkaldy Testing Museum was open, so I looked in.

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Now if you’ve ever looked up in Southwark Street, you may have pondered over this inscription:

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The motto “Facts not opinions” gives you some sense that this was a place of science – and as soon as you step through the door you are whisked back to 1874, when David Kirkaldy set up the testing works at No.99.

As a result of the Industrial Revolution many new materials were developed, but their weaknesses were not always understood, resulting in major incidents such as the 1879 Tay Bridge Disaster. Setting himself up as an independent consultant, Kirkaldy designed and built his own testing machine to investigate and check the strength of many different materials used in building and industry.

The museum houses this enormous machine along with many other examples of testing equipment. I wasn’t in time to see it in action but I can only guess how impressive this is, given the size; the bolts alone are the size of my hand!

I did get to see the Charpy machine working – this tests the brittleness of materials and determines the energy needed to break them. This test was invaluable during the Second World War when the hulls of many Liberty Ships  cracked under the extreme conditions in the North Atlantic.

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The Charpy Machine

Visiting this museum I was struck by the sheer brilliance that a combination of human ingenuity, determination, passion and scientific application can achieve. The tests developed in the 19th century out of the Industrial Revolution are still pretty much the tests used today, albeit with probably more health and safety legislation attached to them. So despite the things I need to fix, those Victorians built me a home which is still standing over 100 years later.

As we move forwards into uncertain times and another form of revolution, I hope that some of those truly British characteristics will surface.

The Kirkaldy Testing Museum is open on the first Sunday of the month